A Twin Engine For Me?

As it relates to twin engine purchases, the biggest barrier to ownership, is cost. As it relates to twin engine operations, one of the biggest concerns for a single engine pilot is the perceived skill set required to operate something with two engines.

 

One of our earliest goals was to utilize the streamlined regulations of the E-AB market to see if we could develop a kit twin that could be operated less expensively than a certified single engine aircraft. Having the option for non-certified engines burning auto fuel will allow pilots the ability to fly a twin engine platform that will actually cost less per hour than a certified single. With this one innovative idea, we’ve now eliminated the single largest “barrier to ownership” that existed.

 

Fixed and faired landing gear, minimizing asymmetrical thrust combined with a large vertical stabilizer for added directional control, increased visibility, even auto feathering propellers were ALL done to ease the transition from a single engine aircraft to a multi-engine aircraft. We did all we could to design in safety and simplicity even before the first engine had been started for all pilots but especially the first and low time multi-engine pilots.

The fact you’re visiting our website, specifically this page, provides a strong indication that you have more than just a passing interest in owning a twin engine airplane.

 

As an airline pilot, A&P mechanic, and flight instructor, my perspectives on what constitutes a great airplane varied from what both experienced aeronautical engineers and the business community considered a great airplane and their questions, posited at various volume levels, reflected that point.

 

What is important for the potential Wolf pilot however was the intense scrutiny not just from the cadre of professional pilots; lifetime aviators willing to fly themselves and their family in the Wolf, but also the business group; people willing to invest in the aircraft, and the engineering group as it needed to satisfy their numerical criteria as well before they put their stamp of approval on it. The end result is while the original essence of the Wolf was maintained, their healthy participation continually forced improvements to the airplane well past its original design drivers, even before the first part was made.